So Much More, p. 107-131 – Part 3: The Laborer Is Worthy of His Wages

“A&E” refers to Anna Sofia and Elizabeth Botkin, authors of So Much More. I chose the abbreviation to save space and time.

Before I wrap up chapter 9, I’d like to comment on a bit of a strange theme I’m seeing emerging from A&E: their seemingly elitist attitude toward wage earners. I first noticed this because they seem bizarrely fond of the terms “wage slave” and “wage slavery” (which Doug Phillips has also used): Continue reading

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So Much More, p. 63-74 – Part 2: Wake Up, Neo!

“A&E” refers to Anna Sofia and Elizabeth Botkin, authors of So Much More. I chose the abbreviation to save space and time.

Since we might as well start this post with a bit of comic relief, this video reflects my general feelings about conspiracy theories. (Apologies for a swear or two and for “retarded.”)

Aside from the point mentioned in the video – that most conspiracy theories are too vast to be pulled off in the real world – they have some other characteristic weak spots that tend to render them unlikely or just downright impossible. Two that come immediately to mind are 1) that conspiracy theories often rely solely on secret conferences, conversations, etc. that the conspiracy theorist cannot confirm actually happened and did not personally witness; and 2) that most conspiracy theories are extremely selective in the information they present, and ignore other information that disproves the theory. I’ll (mostly) be dealing with #2 today, because the view of history that A&E present in Chapter 6 of So Much More has all the hallmarks of this problem, and then some. Continue reading

Hollywood’s Most Despised Villain (TBB)

The “TBB” in the name of this post means that it is part of The Big Box series. If you’re new to Scarlet Letters, read the introductory post to see what the Big Box is all about.

Gather ‘round, kids! It’s time for the creepiest show on earth – Hollywood’s Most Despised Villain by Geoff Botkin!

I know, I know, I don’t usually start posts like that. But in all seriousness, Hollywood’s Most Despised Villain was the creepiest lecture I’ve heard so far. In fact, by the end I felt unsettled even listening to it – and I was only hearing the audio, not seeing Botkin and his body language. So why is it so creepy? Bear with me for just a moment and I’ll show you. Continue reading

Strength and Dignity for Daughters, Part 2: Emotional Purity and Other Sundries (TBB)

The “TBB” in the name of this post means that it is part of The Big Box series. If you’re new to Scarlet Letters, read the introductory post to see what The Big Box is all about.

I might as well begin this post with a confession. Every time I have to read, listen to, or write about the Botkin sisters, sooner or later I always end up listening to and singing this song (any hardcore ballad nerds in my audience will recognize it as Child #10):

The reason I end up at Two Sisters whenever I write about the Botkins should be obvious by now: irony. The sisters in the ballad could not be more unlike Anna Sofia and Elizabeth Botkin if they tried. First, I’m sure Elizabeth would never be caught dead accepting a gay gold ring and a beaver hat from a suitor without her father’s permission (in fact, perhaps Two Sisters is really about the perils of unsupervised courtship 😀 ). Second, Anna and Elizabeth would certainly never get into such hysterics over a boy. They are, after all, important purveyors of the idea of “emotional purity,” which I touched on before in my response to S. M. Davis’ lecture Seven Bible Truths Violated by Christian Dating. Continue reading

Strength and Dignity for Daughters, Part 1: Discovering Patriolatry (TBB)

The “TBB” in the name of this post means that it is part of The Big Box series. If you’re new to Scarlet Letters, read the introductory post to see what The Big Box is all about.

This week, our examination of stay-at-home daughterhood (SAHD) continues with a look at the two-lecture set Strength and Dignity for Daughters. The two lectures are How to Be Your Father’s Arrow, Ambassador and Princess by Anna Sofia Botkin, and How I Learned to Help My Father by Elizabeth Botkin, but since they were each only twenty minutes long and the content was closely related, I’ll be critiquing them simultaneously. This will once again take two posts, the first for the central themes and the second for the assorted strangeness that could not be easily categorized. Continue reading

A Biblical Vision for Multi-Generational Faithfulness (TBB)

The “TBB” in the name of this post means that it is part of The Big Box series. If you’re new to Scarlet Letters, read the introductory post to see what The Big Box is all about.

Well, the homeschool conference is over – but not The Big Box! This week we’ll be meeting one of patriarchy’s more obscure proponents, William Einwechter (though readers who’ve brushed up on their Reconstructionism will probably recognize his name – he’s rather infamous in certain circles for his remarks about stoning rebellious teenagers).[1][2] According to the brief bio on the back of the case, he serves as pastor of Immanuel Free Reformed Church in Pennsylvania and vice president of the National Reform Association. Continue reading