Manly Friendships – Part 1: Covenant Central (TBB)

The “TBB” in the name of this post means that it is part of The Big Box series. If you’re new to Scarlet Letters, read the introductory post to see what the Big Box is all about.

At long last, Lent and Holy Week are over, and that means Hester and the Big Box are back, this time with Manly Friendships by Doug Phillips. But before we get started on that, let’s have a “blast from the past” and review Phillips’ foundational material, which I first covered last March when I critiqued his lecture Manliness. Continue reading

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Easter – Ad cenam Agni providi

One of the earliest Ambrosian hymns, 6th century or earlier, this hymn is used for Vespers from Easter Sunday until Ascension. In the Breviary revision of 1632 by Pope Urban VIII the hymn was so greatly altered that only three lines of the original remained and thus is really a different hymn entirely. The revised hymn can be found under the title of Ad regias Agni dapes. (source) Continue reading

Maundy Thursday – Dominus Jesus postquam cenavit

Dominus Jesus, postquam cenavit cum discipulis,
suis lavit pedes eorum, et ait illis:
Scitis quid fecerim vobis, ego Dominus et Magister?
Exemplum dedi vobis, ut et vos ita faciatis.

Jesus the Lord, after He had supped with His disciples,
washed their feet, and said to them:
“Know you what I, your Lord and Master, have done to you?
I gave you an example, that you also may do likewise.”

Palm Sunday – Pueri Hebraeorum

Pueri Hebraeorum, vestimenta prosternebat in via,
et clamabant dicentes: Hosanna Filio David:
Benedictus qui venit in nomine Domini.

The Hebrew children spread their garments in the way,
And cried out, saying, “Hosanna to the Son of David!
Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord!”

Domini est terra, et plenitudo eius,
Orbis terrarum et universi qui habitant in eo.
Quia ipsa super maria fundavit eum,
Et super flumina praeparavit eum.

The earth is the Lord’s, and all its fullness,
The world and all those who dwell therein.
For He has founded it upon the seas,
And established it upon the waters.

Attollite portas, principes vestras,
Et elevamini, portae aternales:
Et introibit rex gloriae.
Quis est iste rex gloriae?
Dominus fortis et potens:
Dominus potens in praelio.

Lift up your gates, you princes,
And be lifted up, you everlasting doors:
And the King of glory shall enter in.
Who is this King of glory?
The Lord strong and mighty, the Lord mighty in battle.

Attollite portas, principes vestras,
Et elevamini, portae aeternales:
Et introibit rex gloriae.
Quis est iste rex gloriae?
Dominus virtutum ipse est rex gloriae.

Lift up your gates, you princes,
And be lifted up, you everlasting doors:
And the King of glory shall enter in.
Who is this King of glory?
The Lord of hosts; He is the King of glory.

Scripted Christian Storytelling, or, a Meditation on God’s Not Dead

WARNING: Post contains spoilers. Continue reading at your own risk!

When I was 13, I was assigned a simplistic and annoying little book by D. James Kennedy (What If Jesus Had Never Been Born?) for a homeschool religion class. I finished it, but it still made me totally hopping mad. You see, classically trained obsessive music nerd that I was (and still am), I knew an abnormally large amount of music history for my age, and thus could see right through all the outright lies about music in Kennedy’s book. At the time, however, I thought Kennedy was alone when he spouted ridiculous claims like there being no surviving record of ancient Greek music (reality: you can buy a whole album of it here, played on reconstructed instruments), and certainly he had to be the only person shortsighted and arrogant enough to actually believe that just because he hated Bela Bartok’s music, God did too. Continue reading